Cal OES Awards $25 Million in Grants to Local Organizations to Protect Vulnerable Communities from Disasters

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Funding Designed to Increase Disaster Preparedness and Resiliency in Socially Vulnerable Communities Statewide

As part of California’s nation-leading effort to build resilience among vulnerable populations living in areas of the state most susceptible to natural disasters, the California Governor’s Office of Emergency Services (Cal OES) today announced $25 million in grants is being awarded to 93 community partners through the Listos California campaign.

As unfavorable conditions like extreme heat and drought continue to fuel wildfires throughout California, socially vulnerable communities remain disproportionately impacted, not only by devastating wildfires but also earthquakes and other disasters.

In this second wave of funding, Listos California is part of a continuing effort to enhance disaster preparedness by engaging a statewide network of community-based organizations, Tribal Governments, CERTs (Community Emergency Response Teams) and other partners to ensure the state’s most vulnerable are ready when disaster strikes. These grants prioritize communities that are considered both socially vulnerable and at a high risk of being impacted by wildfire, flood, earthquake, drought or heatwave.

“As Californians expect more climate-driven disasters in the years to come, we know these emergencies won’t affect everyone equally,” said Cal OES Director Mark Ghilarducci. “Our Listos California campaign allows us to build readiness and protect lives by investing in the areas where it is needed most to protect our vulnerable communities.”

Socially vulnerable communities are often disproportionately impacted by devastating wildfires, earthquakes, and other natural disasters. This concerted effort by Cal OES to boost disaster preparedness by engaging a statewide network of community-based organizations, Tribal Governments, and Community Emergency Response Teams ensures the state’s most vulnerable are ready when disaster strikes.